Konstantinos Gerasimidis


Senior Lecturer Clinical Nutrition


University of Glasgow


School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing,
R3.09 Level 3, New Lister Building, Glasgow Royal Infirmary


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University of Glasgow
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Konstantinos Gerasmidis


Senior Lecturer Clinical Nutrition



Konstantinos Gerasimidis


Senior Lecturer Clinical Nutrition


University of Glasgow


School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing,
R3.09 Level 3, New Lister Building, Glasgow Royal Infirmary


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University of Glasgow
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Dr Konstantinos Gerasimidis


Dr Konstantinos Gerasimidis is Senior Lecturer in Clinical Nutrition. He has graduated in Nutrition and Dietetics and completed his postgraduate studies in Clinical Nutrition.

During his doctoral research at the University of Glasgow, he explored the effect of exclusive enteral nutrition on the gut microbiota and nutritional status of children with Crohn’s disease. He holds an honorary contract as Clinical Paediatric Nutrition Scientist with the National Health Service at Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Affiliations and memberships He is the Allied Health Professional representative in the Nutrition Committee of the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN).



Richard Russell


Honorary Clinical Associate Professor and Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist


University of Glasgow


Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, The Royal Hospital for Children,
1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK


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Richard Russell


Honorary Clinical Associate Professor and Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist



Richard Russell


Honorary Clinical Associate Professor and Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist


University of Glasgow


Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, The Royal Hospital for Children,
1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK


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Professor Richard Russell


Professor Richard Russell is currently one of six Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologists working in the Royal Hospital for children in Glasgow. He is the lead of PIBD services in the west of Scotland. He is the former chair of Paediatric ECCO having been a committee member for the previous 3 years. He is a member of the ESPGHAN “Porto” IBD group and was chair of the UK paediatric IBD group until the start of 2017. He is the local organiser of the 2019 annual ESPGHAN meeting in Glasgow (www.espghancongress.org/).

He was awarded a PhD for an investigation into the genetic determinants of PIBD in children in 2008. He has published around 120 research papers the vast majority in PIBD including all major GI journals which include previous and forthcoming ECCO/ESPGHAN PIBD guidelines. He is an active clinical researcher in PIBD with a strong interest especially in dietary treatment of Crohn’s disease. He was a co-applicant on the successful European Union horizon 20/20 award recently in conjunction with PIBDnet of which he was one of the founding members.

He says “I remain indebted to my Scottish colleagues and all friends within the PIBD community who support this work including the fantastic Catherine McEwan foundation charity and the BINGO group who make so much of our work possible”.



Richard Hansen


Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist


University of Glasgow


Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, The Royal Hospital for Children,
1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK


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University of Glasgow
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Richard Hansen


Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist



Richard Hansen


Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist


University of Glasgow


Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, The Royal Hospital for Children,
1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK


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University of Glasgow
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Dr Richard Hansen


My main research interest is the gastrointestinal mucosal microbiota and its importance in paediatric disease, particularly inflammatory bowel disease. I am particularly interested in the molecular characterisation of the microbiota and its subsequent modification for the purposes of therapeutic effect.

This theme of microbial therapeutics fits nicely into the concept of stratified medicine since the microbiota is highly individualistic yet also modifiable. Being a paediatrician, I am naturally interested in how the gut microbiota develops as the child grows and matures, particularly at the earliest stages of microbial colonisation. This area of research is a natural extension of my CSO-funded PhD studies during which I was the first to catalogue and publish the colonic microbiota in paediatric IBD at the onset of disease.

I currently hold a competitive fellowship supporting the development of microbial therapeutic studies, awarded by NHS Research Scotland. In addition to my research interests, I have clinical interests in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease and Helicobacter pylori. I am clinical lead for paediatric hepatology and paediatric endoscopy training in the West of Scotland and am the Scottish endoscopy representative on British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

I am co-hosting the 2017 meeting of British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the 2019 meeting of European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition in Glasgow (www.espghancongress.org/).



Simon Milling


Professor of Immunology (Immunology), Associate - Life Sciences (School of Life Sciences)


University of Glasgow


B421 Level B4, Iii - Gbrc,
University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA


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University of Glasgow
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Simon Milling


Professor of Immunology (Immunology), Associate - Life Sciences (School of Life Sciences)



Simon Milling


Professor of Immunology (Immunology), Associate - Life Sciences (School of Life Sciences)


University of Glasgow


B421 Level B4, Iii - Gbrc,
University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA


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University of Glasgow
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Professor Simon Milling


My lab works on the immunology of the intestine, with two specific areas of special interest. First, we focus on the biology of dendritic cells, innate lymphoid cells, and T cells, and how these cells respond to infectious or inflammatory stimuli, and how they change in mice with colorectal cancer. We study the functions of subsets of all these cells in vivo. Using blood and tissue samples from people with intestine-associated inflammatory disease, we also aim to understand the contributions of immune cells to pathogenesis, in order to improve future treatments. Currently we use samples from people with inflammatory bowel disease, psoriatic arthritis, and autoimmune alopecia. The aim of all this work is to understand the vital roles that intestinal immune cells play in the induction and polarisation of adaptive immune responses against pathogens, and how these responses also contribute to disease when they are not properly controlled.



Umer Ijaz


Lecturer in Information Engineering
NERC Independent Research Fellow, Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Leadership Fellow


University of Glasgow


Room 625, Rankine Building,
School of Engineering Oakfield Avenue, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT


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Personal Website
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Umer Ijaz


Lecturer in Information Engineering



Uer Ijaz


Lecturer in Information Engineering
NERC Independent Research Fellow, Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Leadership Fellow


University of Glasgow


Room 625, Rankine Building,
School of Engineering, Oakfield Avenue, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT


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Personal Website
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Dr Umer Zeeshan Ijaz


I lead the Environmental 'Omics Lab in Infrastructure & Environment Division, School of Engineering that I established soon after I was awarded the NERC Independent Research Fellowship back in November, 2014. The purpose of my research is to integrate different sources of 'omics data (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metabolomics, and metaproteomics) in environmental science for microbial community analysis.

The computational based comparative analysis of DNA sequences may provide information about genome structure, gene function, metabolic and regulatory pathways, how microbial genomes evolve, how they exist in a community and how they compete for resources whether they work together in a symbiosis or otherwise.



Christine Edwards


Professor of Nutritional Physiology (Medicine), Associate (Institute of Health and Wellbeing)


University of Glasgow


School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing,
Room 3.05, New Lister Building, Glasgow Royal Infirmary


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University of Glasgow
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Christine Edwards


Professor of Nutritional Physiology (Medicine), Associate (Institute of Health and Wellbeing)



Christine Edwards


Professor of Nutritional Physiology (Medicine), Associate (Institute of Health and Wellbeing)


University of Glasgow


School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing,
Room 3.05, New Lister Building, Glasgow Royal Infirmary


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University of Glasgow
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Professor Christine Edwards


Christine Edwards is Professor of Nutritional Physiology in the School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing at the University of Glasgow where she has worked for 28 years. She trained at the University of Sheffield with a BSc in Biochemistry and Physiology and in her PhD developed one of the first continuous culture models to study the human colonic microbiota and the impact of diet and environment on bacterial metabolism. She worked as a post doc in Sheffield University studying gut function, motility and short chain fatty acids. She then worked at Edinburgh University studying the gut microbiota and their role in the health effects of dietary fibre and resistant starch before moving to the University of Glasgow as a Lecturer in 1990.

In Glasgow, she focused on early bacterial colonisation of the infant gut and the role of environment and early diet, funded by two multi-partner EU grants (MEDIGUT and INFABIO) of which she was the co-ordinator.

She then studied the role of gut bacteria and carbohydrate substrates in Crohn’s disease, obesity and human metabolism. Her current work funded by the BBSRC Manipulating the activity of the gut microbiota with fermentable carbohydrates to maximise the bioavailability of bioactive phenolic acids for health. This project is studying the interactions of dietary fibre and plant polyphenols (often consumed together) on bioactive molecules such as SCFA and phenolic acids released by the colonic microbiota. She is also a co-investigator for a MRC GCRF project, in Malawi studying Development of nutritional strategies for diabetes prevention in Malawian adults at high diabetes risk. In addition, she is leading an ILSI Europe working group to evaluate the evidence for the transfer of bacteria from mother to infant through the placenta and via the breast milk microbiome http://ilsi.eu/task-forces/nutrition/early-nutrition-and-long-term-health/.



Daniel Gaya


Consultant Gastroenterologist and Honorary Clinical Associate Professor


University of Glasgow


Gastroenterology Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK


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ResearchGate
Cure Crohn's Colitis


Daniel Gaya


Consultant Gastroenterologist and Honorary Clinical Associate Professor



Dan Gaya


Consultant Gastroenterologist and Honorary Clinical Associate Professor


University of Glasgow


Gastroenterology Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK


Email
ResearchGate
Cure Crohn's Colitis


Dr Daniel Gaya


Dr Daniel Gaya is a consultant gastroenterologist at Glasgow Royal Infirmary. He is also an Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Glasgow Medical School. He has received comprehensive training in Glasgow, Edinburgh, London & Chicago in acute and general medicine, luminal gastroenterology, hepatology and therapeutic endoscopy.

Dr Gaya's sub-specialist interest is inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and he receives tertiary referrals for the management of complex IBD cases and set up the transition clinic for adolescents with IBD with colleagues at the Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow. Dr Gaya is board member of the Scottish IBD charity C³ (www.curecrohnscolitis.org) and a member of the British Society of Gastroenterology IBD Committee.

Dr Gaya is in receipt of a research fellowship from the Chief Scientist Office (CSO) of the Scottish Government to undertake a comprehensive IBD research programme in the West of Scotland. His main research interests include novel clinical trials in IBD, environmental/dietary factors in IBD management/pathogenesis and faecal biomarkers. He has recently been awarded funding to explore the role of faecal transplantation in ulcerative colitis (MRC £2.6M), environmental factors effecting disease outcome in IBD (CSO £250K) and the link between intestinal inflammation and spondyloarthopathy (Arthritis UK £200K).



Chris Quince


Lecturer in Biological Systems Modelling


University of Warwick


WMS - Microbiology and Infection, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL


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Chris Quince


Lecturer in Biological Systems Modelling



Chris Quince


Lecturer in Biological Systems Modelling


University of Warwick


WMS - Microbiology and Infection, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL


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Dr Christopher Quince


Metagenomics coupled to next generation sequencing has transformed our understanding of the microbial world. It has allowed us to directly determine community structure and function in situ from the DNA of the organisms present. This is revolutionising microbial ecology. My research consists of the development of improved statistical and bioinformatics tools for interpreting this sequence data.

These tools exploit advanced methods from machine learning and Bayesian statistics. I work on both 16S rRNA gene amplicon data, having developed the AmpliconNoise algorithm for error removal from 454 pyrosequenced ampliconshttp://code.google.com/p/ampliconnoise/ and shotgun metagenomics for example the CONCOCT algorithm for automated genome extraction from shotgun metagenome reads https://github.com/BinPro/CONCOCT. In addition, I also develop Bayesian statistical models for interpreting microbial community structure addressing questions such as are enterotypes real features of the human gut microbiome and are microbial communities neutrally assembled? In collaboration with numerous groups around the world I apply these methods to both environmental and host-associated microbial communities.

For instance, with Dr Konstantinos Gerasimidis (University of Glasgow) and Dr Nick Loman (University of Birmimgham) I have resolved the changes in gut microbiota composition of children with Crohn's disease during treatment with exclusive enteral nutrition. This could potentially lead to improved therapeutic strategies.

With Dr Gavin Collins (University of Galway) I study the structure of anaerobic digestion reactor communities. More efficient AD digesters will provide more effective biogas production from wastewater, reducing pollution and providing a renewable energy resource. I am currently employed as an MRC Principal Research Fellow as part of the Cloud Computing for Microbial Bioinformatics (CLIMB) consortium.



George Raptis


Consultant in Paediatric Allergy and General Paediatrics, Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer


University of Glasgow


The Royal Hospital for Children,
1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK


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University of Glasgow
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George Raptis


Consultant in Paediatric Allergy and General Paediatrics, Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer



George Raptis


Consultant in Paediatric Allergy and General Paediatrics, Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer


University of Glasgow


The Royal Hospital for Children,
1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK


Email
University of Glasgow
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Dr George Raptis


Dr George Raptis is an Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer and Consultant in Paediatric Allergy, based at the Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow. George's main interest is to understand further the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal allergy in children. Better understanding of the microenvironment of the gastrointestinal mucosa and mechanisms of allergy will enable researchers and clinicians to develop means to prevent or induce immunological tolerance. Additionally, he is striving to develop a model of care for allergic patients that aims to consider each stage of the allergic disease continuum and propose a number of strategies to provide consumer-focussed, best care. Dr Raptis is committed to contributing to the development of research in this field in order to alleviate the impact of allergies on sufferers.



Gordon Ramage


Professor (Dental School), Associate Academic (Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation)


University of Glasgow


School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing, L16 Level 9, 378 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow Dental Hospital & School


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University of Glasgow
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Gordon Ramage


Professor (Dental School), Associate Academic (Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation)



Gordon Ramage


Professor (Dental School), Associate Academic (Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation)


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School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing, L16 Level 9, 378 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow Dental Hospital & School


Email
University of Glasgow
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Professor Gordon Ramage


Gordon is an intelligent researcher with excellent networking skills. An up and coming clinical scientist with interests in biofilms, oral microbiology, and antifungal development.



Dan Walker


Professor (Bacteriology), Associate - Life Sciences (School of Life Sciences), Associate (Biochemistry & Cell Biology)


University of Glasgow


RB226 Level B2, Iii - Gbrc, University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA


Email
University of Glasgow
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Dan Walker


Professor (Bacteriology), Associate - Life Sciences (School of Life Sciences), Associate (Biochemistry & Cell Biology)



Dan Walker


Professor (Bacteriology), Associate - Life Sciences (School of Life Sciences), Associate (Biochemistry & Cell Biology)


University of Glasgow


RB226 Level B2, Iii - Gbrc, University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA


Email
University of Glasgow
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Professor Daniel Walker


We aim to develop highly selective and potent protein antibiotics (bacteriocins) for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and for use in agricultural applications. In addition, we are interested in determining the mechanism of action of bacteriocins, studying fundamental aspects of membrane biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria and deleloping cross-linking stratagies for structural proteomics.

Current research projects include:
Protein antibiotics as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic biofilm-mediated infection.
Harnessing bacteriocins active against bacterial plant pathogens.
Mapping protein-protein interactions in the translocation and assembly module (TAM) complex involved in autotransporter biogenesis.
Development of cross-linking strategies for structural proteomics